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  • Sandhill Cranes

    Two Sandhill Cranes and a flock of Greater-white Fronted Geese flying across a rising sun. - Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes are the most abundant of the world's 15 crane species. They are widely distributed throughout North America, extending into Cuba and far northeastern Siberia. Height: 3-5 feet. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes winter in the Central Valley of California. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Greater Sandhill Cranes are the largest sub-species (Lesser, Canadian, Florida, Mississippi, and Cuban being the others). Body plumage is characterized by varying shades of gray. - Phil & Marilyn Isenberg Sandhill Crane Preserve, California.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes preen iron-rich mud into their feathers creating a deep rusty brown hue which lasts throughout the spring and summer. As fall advances, these rusty feathers molt, and the birds return to their grayish appearance. - Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes, engage in unison calling (bugleing), which is a series of coordinated calls. While bugleing, cranes stand in an upright posture, usually with their heads thrown back and beaks skyward during the display. While bugleing, the female raises her beak about 45 degrees above the horizontal while the male raises his bill to a vertical position. - Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Juvenile plumage changes from cinnamon brown to gray as the bird matures during the first year. - Phil & Marilyn Isenberg Sandhill Crane Preserve, California.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Flying into a lifting, and early morning fog, with the sun just starting to break through. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Dancing Sandhill Cranes

    All cranes engage in dancing, which includes various behaviors such as bowing, jumping, running, stick or grass tossing, as well as wing flapping. Normally it is associated with courtship, although dancing can occur at any age and season. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Dancing Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Sandhill Cranes stand on average from 4.5 to 5 feet tall. - Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced National Wildlife Refuge

  • Sandhill Crane

    All cranes are omnivorous. Sandhill Cranes are generalists and feed on a wide variety of plant tubers, grains, small vertebrates (e.g. mice and snakes), and invertebrates such as insects or worms. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cranes flying across a early morning sky. - Phil & Marilyn Isenberg Sandhill Crane Preserve

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying across a morning sky. - Merced National Wildlife Refuge

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced National Wildlife Refuge

  • Sarus Crane

    This is the tallest crane species standing at six feet tall, with a wingspan of eight feet. Distinguished by the overall grey colour and the contrasting red head and upper neck with a grey ear patch. - Denver Zoo

  • White-naped Crane

    The White-naped Crane breeds in Mongolia, China, and Russia. Height: 4 feet. - Bronx Zoo

  • Blue Crane

    Blue Cranes are endemic to South Africa, with more than 99% of the population occurring within that country. Height: 4 feet. - Denver Zoo

  • Blue Crane

    Denver Zoo

  • Grey-crowned Crane

    The Grey Crowned Crane’s range stretches from the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, and Kenya to southeastern South Africa. They are non-migratory, but undertake variable local and seasonal movements. Height: 3 ft; Wingspan: 3.7 ft , photo by Alice Elliott

  • Grey-crowned Crane

    Photo by Alice Elliott

  • Grey-crowned Crane

    Photo by Alice Elliott

  • Eurasian Crane

    The breeding range of the Eurasian Crane extends from Europe across Eurasia to Mongolia, China, and Siberia. Height: 4 feet. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    It is the only flamingo which naturally inhabits North America. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    The American Flamingo breeds in the Galápagos Islands, coastal Colombia, Venezuela, Cuba, Turks and Caicos Islands, and along the Yucatán Peninsula. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    Their life expectancy of 40 years is one of the longest in birds. Height: 47-57 inches tall. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    Denver Zoo

  • Chilean Flamingo

    Native to South America. SF Zoo

  • Chilean Flamingo

    SF Zoo

  • Chilean Flamingo

    SF Zoo

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    Their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age and location. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    Unlike Herons, or Egrets Spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    The Roseate Spoonbill nests in shrubs or trees, often mangroves. Immature birds have white, feathered heads, and the pink of the plumage is paler. The bill is yellowish or pinkish. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Royal Spoonbill

    Native to Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. - Christchurch, New Zealand

  • Royal Spoonbill

    The Royal Spoonbill is a large, white bird with a black, spoon-shaped bill. It is approximately 31 inches tall. Breeding Plumage: distinctive yellow eye patch, crest on back of neck, and cream colored patch on the breast. - Christchurch, New Zealand.

  • Royal Spoonbill

    The Royal Spoonbill lives in wetlands and feeds on crustaceans, fish and small insects by sweeping its bill from side to side. - Otago Peninsula,New Zealand

  • Wood Stork

    A large, white, bald-headed wading bird of the Gulf Coast. The Wood Stork is the only stork that breeds in North America. - Florida

  • Wood Stork

    Height: 33–45 inches tall. - Florida

  • Marabou Stork

    Native to Africa. SF Zoo

  • Marabou Stork

    SF Zoo

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Two Sandhill Cranes and a flock of Greater-white Fronted Geese flying across a rising sun. - Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes are the most abundant of the world's 15 crane species. They are widely distributed throughout North America, extending into Cuba and far northeastern Siberia. Height: 3-5 feet. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes winter in the Central Valley of California. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Greater Sandhill Cranes are the largest sub-species (Lesser, Canadian, Florida, Mississippi, and Cuban being the others). Body plumage is characterized by varying shades of gray. - Phil & Marilyn Isenberg Sandhill Crane Preserve, California.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes preen iron-rich mud into their feathers creating a deep rusty brown hue which lasts throughout the spring and summer. As fall advances, these rusty feathers molt, and the birds return to their grayish appearance. - Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Sandhill Cranes, engage in unison calling (bugleing), which is a series of coordinated calls. While bugleing, cranes stand in an upright posture, usually with their heads thrown back and beaks skyward during the display. While bugleing, the female raises her beak about 45 degrees above the horizontal while the male raises his bill to a vertical position. - Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Juvenile plumage changes from cinnamon brown to gray as the bird matures during the first year. - Phil & Marilyn Isenberg Sandhill Crane Preserve, California.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Flying into a lifting, and early morning fog, with the sun just starting to break through. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying through an early morning fog. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Dancing Sandhill Cranes

    All cranes engage in dancing, which includes various behaviors such as bowing, jumping, running, stick or grass tossing, as well as wing flapping. Normally it is associated with courtship, although dancing can occur at any age and season. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Dancing Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Sandhill Cranes stand on average from 4.5 to 5 feet tall. - Cosumnes River Preserve.

  • Sandhill Crane

    Merced NWR, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced National Wildlife Refuge

  • Sandhill Crane

    All cranes are omnivorous. Sandhill Cranes are generalists and feed on a wide variety of plant tubers, grains, small vertebrates (e.g. mice and snakes), and invertebrates such as insects or worms. - Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cranes flying across a early morning sky. - Phil & Marilyn Isenberg Sandhill Crane Preserve

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Crane

    Cosumnes River Preserve, California

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Flying across a morning sky. - Merced National Wildlife Refuge

  • Sandhill Cranes

    Merced National Wildlife Refuge

  • Sarus Crane

    This is the tallest crane species standing at six feet tall, with a wingspan of eight feet. Distinguished by the overall grey colour and the contrasting red head and upper neck with a grey ear patch. - Denver Zoo

  • White-naped Crane

    The White-naped Crane breeds in Mongolia, China, and Russia. Height: 4 feet. - Bronx Zoo

  • Blue Crane

    Blue Cranes are endemic to South Africa, with more than 99% of the population occurring within that country. Height: 4 feet. - Denver Zoo

  • Blue Crane

    Denver Zoo

  • Grey-crowned Crane

    The Grey Crowned Crane’s range stretches from the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, and Kenya to southeastern South Africa. They are non-migratory, but undertake variable local and seasonal movements. Height: 3 ft; Wingspan: 3.7 ft , photo by Alice Elliott

  • Grey-crowned Crane

    Photo by Alice Elliott

  • Grey-crowned Crane

    Photo by Alice Elliott

  • Eurasian Crane

    The breeding range of the Eurasian Crane extends from Europe across Eurasia to Mongolia, China, and Siberia. Height: 4 feet. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    It is the only flamingo which naturally inhabits North America. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    The American Flamingo breeds in the Galápagos Islands, coastal Colombia, Venezuela, Cuba, Turks and Caicos Islands, and along the Yucatán Peninsula. - Denver Zoo

  • American Flamingo

    Their life expectancy of 40 years is one of the longest in birds. Height: 47-57 inches tall. - Denver Zoo

  • Chilean Flamingo

    Native to South America. SF Zoo

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    Their pink color is diet-derived, consisting of the carotenoid pigment canthaxanthin. The colors can range from pale pink to bright magenta, depending on age and location. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    Unlike Herons, or Egrets Spoonbills fly with their necks outstretched. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    This species feeds in shallow fresh or coastal waters by swinging its bill from side to side as it steadily walks through the water, often in groups. The spoon-shaped bill allows it to sift easily through mud. It feeds on crustaceans, aquatic insects, frogs, newts and very small fish ignored by larger waders. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Roseate Spoonbill

    The Roseate Spoonbill nests in shrubs or trees, often mangroves. Immature birds have white, feathered heads, and the pink of the plumage is paler. The bill is yellowish or pinkish. - Ding Darling NWR, Florida

  • Royal Spoonbill

    Native to Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, and the Solomon Islands. - Christchurch, New Zealand

  • Royal Spoonbill

    The Royal Spoonbill is a large, white bird with a black, spoon-shaped bill. It is approximately 31 inches tall. Breeding Plumage: distinctive yellow eye patch, crest on back of neck, and cream colored patch on the breast. - Christchurch, New Zealand.

  • Royal Spoonbill

    The Royal Spoonbill lives in wetlands and feeds on crustaceans, fish and small insects by sweeping its bill from side to side. - Otago Peninsula,New Zealand

  • Wood Stork

    A large, white, bald-headed wading bird of the Gulf Coast. The Wood Stork is the only stork that breeds in North America. - Florida

  • Wood Stork

    Height: 33–45 inches tall. - Florida

  • Marabou Stork

    Native to Africa. SF Zoo